Douglas County, Missouri

Times Past

MOGenWeb Site, Johnna Quick -- Coordinator

 

Times Past
Excerpts from The Ozark County Times
Submitted by Mary Ruth (Luna) Sparks


From the Ozark County Times, 9 May 2008:
May 23, 1902
Last Monday, a tornado swept the county about six miles east of this place. One of the most terrific downpours of rain was experienced. Lick Creek rose 10 feet in one hour. No fatalities were reported.
Jan. 28, 1910 Died, John B. McClendon, at the home of his daughter and son-in-law, John Coonce, six miles northwest of here, of old age, on Monday, Jan. 24, 1910. He was 94 years old and was the oldest person in the county…He was laid to rest in the Gainesville cemetery on Jan. 26.
June 6, 1910 There will be a two days picnic at Theodosia on the 4th and 5th of July. A large attendance and an enjoyable time is promised. James Robbins and Bert Miller of Mammoth were in this city a few days ago having this office print bills for a picnic at the Coffey schoolhouse on the 4th of July.
July 15, 1910 N. Shanks and D. W. Strong of Zanoni were here Saturday and at night attended I. O. O. F. lodge. Miss Mattie Woods of West Plains is here this week making an effort to organize a lodge of Royal Neighbors at this place.
July 1914 Quite a bit of excitement was created here Tuesday when three automobiles from West Plains arrived in town. The first one carried Mr. Robert Martin and Guy Buck, second one J. R. Reed and son Orr, Mrs. Wattenbarger and Mrs. J. N. Herd and daughter, Miss Roy, and the third carried Mr. and Mrs. Renfro and daughter Mattie. They claimed having made the trip in 2 hours and 45 minutes, actual running time.
Oct. 3, 1940 About 46 relatives and friends of Uncle Pitt Luna met at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Nelves Luna Sept. 11 to help Uncle Pitt celebrate his 91st birthday. All of his children were present except one, E. F. At the noon hour a gorgeous dinner was spread. The afternoon was spent singing hymns, visiting and eating watermelons. Uncle Pitt sang two hymns after which the choir, led by Edley Hamilton sang some beautiful songs.
Billie Exline of Ava and Miss Mattalene Graves, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. V. A. Graves of this city, were married one evening last week.
Isabella: There will be a graveyard working here Oct. 4-5. Everybody interested come and bring tools to work with.
Some from here have gone to southeast Missouri to pick cotton.
July 3, 1941 Five hundred officers and men of HQ Medical Battalion of the 6th Division at Fort Leonard Wood passed through Gainesville enroute to Lake Taneycomo on a July 4 week end jaunt. They made the trip in 100 Army trucks and ambulances and were traveling in three separate units with about three minutes between each unit.
Sept. 7, 1944 The following people have registered their dog and paid one dollar tax. If you have not done so, please go to the Bank and register your dog and pay the tax. J. W. St. John 1, A. B. Roberts 1, R. O. Gilliland 1, P. O. Sims 1, Steve Pace 1, Wm. Morrison 2, Charles Oliver Luna 1, A. G. Dooley 2, G. D. Ebrite 1, Ray Isham 3, O. S. McClendon 2, Jimmie Lee Rose 1, U. B. Parker 1, Everett Herd 1, Hayes Crisp 1, C. C. Bushong 1, Jerry Hobbs 1, Carylon Sue Bushong 2, Chunk Wood 2, Irene Rae Young 1, Charles Luna 1, Helen June Blisard 1. Please register your dog before the 15th of September so we can make our final check up and destroy all dogs that have not been paid for.
May 11, 1972 Approximately 80 turkeys were killed in Ozark County during the turkey season, W. F. Hailey, area conservation supervisor said.
Halbert Smith, a graduating high school senior, has been awarded a $100 College of Agriculture scholarship to the University of Missouri – Columbia.
April 15, 1982 Grandparents day was celebrated at Gainesville Elementary school last Thursday. Ina Hambelton and Rosie Miller tied for having the most grandchildren enrolled.
April 22, 1982 Maxine (Shaw) Shanerman, Gainesville, has announced her candidacy for the office of county collector for Ozark County on the Democratic ticket.
May 6, 1982 Decoration services will be held Sunday at 11 a.m. at the Isabella cemetery, weather permitting. If inclement weather, the services will be held inside the church. Decoration services and a pig roast will be held Sunday, May 16, at the Howards Ridge Cemetery. Persons planning to attend should bring a covered dish


From the Ozark County Times, 16 Apr 2008:
Ozark County News
June 4, 1891
Ad: Call at the Photograph gallery and have your photograph taken. Thos. Glass, Photographer.
Y. E. McClendon was out west last week seeing after the new onyx mine lately opened up by Messrs. Gordon, Turnbo, Love, Harrison and McClendon. He reports a big thing, says they have about two tons out and in good shape.
Bakersfield. The Bakersfield Mining Co. has struck it rich. They report that the last blast made on Saturday that they found copper in paying quantities.
The Boomerang, Bakersfield
Nov. 30, 1901
Quite a disturbance was created on the streets of Bakersfield on Nov. 16 by a lot of men and boys who had indulged in too much fire water. After it had been quelled and nearly all of the citizens of the town had retired, a number of shots were fired into store buildings, the church and the distillery.
Ozark County Times
Jan. 25, 1929
Ad. Prof. Howard’s Big Fun Show presenting Vaudeville, slight of hand, magic and hypnotism. At the Amyx Hall Jan. 24, 25, 26 at Gainesville, Mo. No reserved seats. Doors open 7:30
Ozark County Times
Feb. 1, 1929
On last Thursday during the heavy rain, Mrs. Vada Rogers Jonnigan clinging to a tree after being thrown into the icy water of Spring Creek near Elijah for seven hours, was drowned while attempting to crawl to the bank along a rope which those on the shore had thrown to her.
Mrs. Jonnigan’s tragic death followed desperate efforts of farmers of the vicinity who worked for hours to rescue her and her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Johnson of Elijah. Johnson and his wife were helped from the water soon after Mrs. Jonnigan was drowned. They were near collapse when taken from the cold water.
. . . The tragedy occurred at the Hensley crossing of Spring Creek on the Kelly-Wylder ranch. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson and Mrs. Jonnigan were riding on a wagon loaded with furniture. As they attempted to cross the ordinarily small stream, a wall of water suddenly swept down upon them, turning the wagon over and throwing the three into the raging stream.
Ozark County Times
Feb. 15, 1929
Another disastrous fire visited Gainesville about 1 .m. Sunday when the A. D. McDonald general store, the O. L. Luna barber shop, Dr. H. E. Pace’s office, Dr. J. L. Beason’s office and the Blair grocery were completely destroyed with all their contents
. . . Citizens soon responded to the alarm but could do nothing toward checking the flames. . . All efforts then went were made to prevent the fire from spreading to other buildings. With the aid of the snow on the roof and a good high fire wall, the Ford concrete building on the north was saved, thus saving the bank and Central hotel buildings, wooden structures, which surely would have burned had the fire not been checked at the Ford building.
April 2, 1942
Ad. Ozark Theatre Gainesville Mo. Saturday, April 4th. Father Takes a Wife. Adolphe Menjou, Gloria Swanson and John Howard. A real thrill for you. Gloria is back in a honey of a comedy! Matinee Saturday at 1:30 P.M. Night show begins at 8 p.m.
Ad. Don’t Miss “Listen to Leon,” A comedy in Three Acts presented by Senior Class Thornfield High School Friday, April 10, 1942. Cast: John Pierce, Geneva Wallace, Amy Delp, Olen Deckard, Russell Heriford, Bob Ball, Maxine Hobbs, Margie Griffith. Admission 10 and 25 cents.
Ozark County Times
Jan. 16, 1945
Pfc. Tol B. N. Nave, of Pontiac, has been awarded the Silver Star by Maj. Gen. Paul J. Mueller, Commanding General, 61st “Wildcat” Infantry Division, for gallantry in action against the Japanese on Peleliu Island.
Despite severe wounds, received while participating in an attack by his company, Pvt. Nave refused to be evacuated and enlisting the aid of several litter bearers, moved forward to render first aid to the casualties. Intense enemy fire pinned down the litter squad, but Pfc. Nave with utter disregard for his personal safety, crawled forward alone and administered first aid until evacuation of these causalities was possible. . ..
Pvt. Nave is a medical corpsman. He is the son of Jake A. Nave of Pontiac, Mo.


From the Ozark County Times, 30 Apr 2008:
Ozark County News
Feb. 7, 1889
The expense of keeping up the public road is becoming considerable. It amounts this year to over $600.
May 16, 1889
Grabeel: Our aged friend and neighbor, Mr. William Newsom has passed beyond the toils of this world. He died May 11 leaving a wife and little daughter.
Feb. 13, 1890
The minstrel troup of this place will show at Dora Saturday night.
July 3, 1890
Clark Bros. circus exhibited here last Monday and was attended by a large crowd from all over the county.
Feb. 12, 1891
A number of gypsies have pitched their camp south of town.
George MacDonald is standing high this week. It’s a boy, and George says it adds one more to the Republican party.
Ozark County News
April 2, 1891
The Gainesville Blues and the Noble Reds played an interesting game of ball at Noble last Friday which resulted in a victory for the Blues.
We are grieved to learn of the death of Mrs. A. C. Luna and Mrs. John Patrick both of whom died this week.
Ozark County Times
Jan. 3, 1908
Lilly: On last Sunday evening about 70 of the young folks and neighbors gathered at the home of E. W. Ebrite and spent a very pleasant time listening to the phonograph and singing.
Jan. 17, 1908
Ad: We now have a few nice maps of Ozark County and while they last we will sell them for $1 each. John C. Harlin
June 4, 1909
Decoration Services Sunday at Sweeton Cemetery were well atatended and excellent addresses were made by Rev. McMutry, Albert Thompson and Mr. Brunns.
Sept. 16, 1910
Howard Ridge: Everett Pleasant, a member of the Lick Creek ball team was hurt several days ago in a game between the Lick Creek and Theodosia teams. He was hit on the jaw with the ball and is suffering much with the injury.
Feb. 12, 1891
A number of gypsies have pitched their camp south of town.
George MacDonald is standing high this week. It’s a boy, and George says it adds one more to the Republican party.
Jan. 20, 1944
Mrs. Geo. W. Pool of Drury, Mo., has received a letter from her son Lynn Pool, who was wounded in November, and he states that he has recovered sufficiently to return to active duty. He was in the hospital for more than six weeks.
He tells her that he still has the Testament that his friend, J. C. Harlin, gave him when he entered the service. He states that he has been in some tough places. He was in the front line of the battle of Tunisa, Sicily, but now is in Italy.
Jan. 27, 1944
Business men of Ozark County are planning to organize a Chamber of Commerce, and a meeting was held in the Court House Tuesday night to talk over the possibilities of organizing. A good crowd of citizens attended. After a very encouraging talk by Mr. E. L. Yeoman, vice president of the Douglas County Chamber of Commerce, it was decided to organize. The temporary Chairman, H. T. Harlin, ordered a set of constitution and by laws drafted and be voted on at the next meeting Feb. 1.
March 30, 1944
The Bakersfield State Bank which has been serving that community faithfully and efficiently for nearly 40 years, is this week being placed in voluntary liquidation by its board of directors according to announcement made by the president, Noble Mitchell, and his mother, Mrs. Juanita “Pet” Mitchell, who has been its cashier for nearly a quarter of a century. . .
The bank is in sound financial condition and all depositors and stockholders will be paid in full, the official notice states.
Sept. 7, 1944
A number of relatives and friends gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Elijah Willbanks near Pontiac recently to help celebrate Elijah’s 61st birthday. At the noon hour, a bountiful dinner was spread on the lawn. The afternoon was spent in visiting.
PFC. Chester R. Bowler, 23, of Trail, was killed in action in North Burma, on July 7. He is survived by his wife, little son, his parents, one brother and two sisters.


From the Ozark County Times:
Ozark County News
May 17, 1883
On yesterday afternoon, some hours before nightfall, the sky became overshadowed by heavy threatening clouds . . ..
Presently the storm burst forth, and the rain came down in torrents and for about five hours, it continued without abatement. . .
As a consequence, Lick Crek was raised to a miniature flood, also, other streams, but to what extent we are not advised – except we are safe in stating that much damage was done on Barren Fork by the overflow in that stream. . .
One of the greatest losses is that of the steam cotton gin which was totally demolished by the flood. The building, in addition to the machinery, contained about 12 bales of seed cotton. This floated away but part of it may be recovered as it formed a drift some distance below. The machinery is all broken. The loss in this case will approximate $2000. . .
Latest reports from Bryant are that it was out of its banks and still rising.
The effect of this loss will be felt most keenly by the farmers as it is a bad season of the year for such a set back.
Ozark County Times
July 23, 1909
Uncle Harvey Hunt died at his home in this place on Friday morning, July 16, 1909, of heart failure. He had been complaining only a few days and on Thursday evening was supposed to be improving, but early Friday morning had an attack of heart failure from which he could not rally.
The remains were interred in the Gainesville Cemetery late Friday afternoon.
July 16, 1909
The K. C. Ozark and Southern Ry. Co. has already built 7 or 8 miles south from Mansfield and intends extending the line to Gainesville.
Ozark County Times
July 1, 1910
Romance: Misses Reed Julien, Maude White, Lora Cooper and Claud Melton, Marvin Pare and Marshal Young had a very exciting game of croquet last Saturday.
Everyone is busy getting ready for the picnic July 4th. Some are going to Noble July 2, some to Arp the 4th and some are going to be very patriotic and go to both.
July 29, 1910
It is said there were seven or eight hundred people at the picnic at Dora on the 25th. A number from this place attended.
Wanted: Horses and mules. I will be at Gainesville on Aug. 9, 10 and 11 to buy horses from 4 to 6 years old. Must be fat. Will also buy mules 4 to 8 years old. Must be fat. D. W. Hoover.
Howard Ridge: Steward Stevens has had a phone put in his house.
Sept. 26, 1910.
School begins Monday. J.R. Small who has been principal of the Gainesville school for nine yeas will take charge again this year.
Mrs. Ralph Luna, of this city, who is ill with typhoid fever, is reported slowing improving.
Caney: Our school at Smith’s Chapel is progressing nicely under the management of Huby Harrison. We have one of the largest country schools in the county and if we could build another room and grade our school, we would have one of the best schools in the county.
Sept. 16, 1910
Sam H. Gilliland left on the hack Monday morning for Springfield where he will spend four or five days seeing the Ringling Bros. Circus and other attractions that will be in Springfield this week.
June 7, 1929
J. F. Johnson and Mr. Byvank, publisher of the Bakersfield News, of Bakersfield, accompanied by Mr. Henry Spurgeon and son, D. M. Spurgeon of Frankford, Ind., made the Times office a pleasant visit Tuesday afternoon. The Spurgeons were looing about with a view of locating somewhere in this region.
Oct. 18, 1929
Wade Callicott, merchanic at the Amyx Auto Co. garage was taken to West Plains Monday suffering with appendicitis, and it was said an operation would be necessary.
S. F. Amyx and wife, who had been at Hot Springs, Ark., the past few weeks taking the baths, arrived home Friday evening. Mrs. Amyx believes the baths have done her much good.


From the Ozark County Times, 23 Apr 2008:
Ozark County News
June 4, 1891
Ad: Call at the Photograph gallery and have your photograph taken. Thos. Glass, Photographer.
Y. E. McClendon was out west last week seeing after the new onyx mine lately opened up by Messrs. Gordon, Turnbo, Love, Harrison and McClendon. He reports a big thing, says they have about two tons out and in good shape.
Bakersfield. The Bakersfield Mining Co. has struck it rich. They report that the last blast made on Saturday that they found copper in paying quantities.
The Boomerang, Bakersfield
Nov. 30, 1901
Quite a disturbance was created on the streets of Bakersfield on Nov. 16 by a lot of men and boys who had indulged in too much fire water. After it had been quelled and nearly all of the citizens of the town had retired, a number of shots were fired into store buildings, the church and the distillery.
Ozark County Times
Jan. 25, 1929
Ad. Prof. Howard’s Big Fun Show presenting Vaudeville, alight of hand magic and hypnotism. At the Amyx Hall Jan. 24, 25, 26 at Gainesville, Mo. No reserved seats. Doors open 7:30
Ozark County Times
Feb. 1, 1929
On last Thursday during the heavy rain, Mrs. Vada Rogers Jonnigan clinging to a tree after being thrown into the icy water of Spring Creek near Elijah for seven hours, was drowned while attempting to crawl to the bank along a rope which those on the shore had thrown to her.
Mrs. Jonnigan’s tragic death followed desperate efforts of farmers of the vicinity who worked for hours to rescue her and her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Johnson of Elijah. Johnson and his wife were helped from the water soon after Mrs. Jonnigan was drowned. They were near collapse when taken from the cold water.
. . . The tragedy occurred at the Hensley crossing of Spring Creek on the Kelly-Wylder ranch. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson and Mrs. Jonnigan were riding in a wagon loaded with furniture. As they attempted to cross the ordinarily small stream, a wall of water suddenly swept down upon them, turning the wagon over and throwing the three into the raging stream.
Ozark County Times
Feb. 15, 1929
Another disastrous fire visited Gainesville about 1 .m. Sunday when the A. D. McDonald general store, the O. L. Luna barber shop, Dr. H. E. Pace’s office, Dr. J. L. Beason’s office and the Blair grocery were completely destroyed with all their contents
. . . Citizens soon responded to the alarm but could do nothing toward checking the flames. . . All efforts then went were made to prevent the fire from spreading to other buildings. With the aid of the snow on the roof and a good high fire wall, the Ford concrete building on the north was saved, thus saving the bank and Central hotel buildings, wooden structures, which surely would have burned had the fire not been checked at the Ford building.
July 3, 1941
Five hundred officers and men of HQ Medical Battalion of the 6th Division at Fort Leonard Wood passed through Gainesville enroute to Lake Taneycomo on a July 4 week end jaunt.
They made the trip in 100 Army trucks and ambulances and were traveling in three separate units with about three minutes between each unit.
April 2, 1942
Ad. Ozark Theatre Gainesville Mo. Saturday, April 4th Father Takes a Wife. Adolphe Menjou, Gloria Swanson and John Howard. A real thrill for you. Gloria is back in a honey of a comedy! Matinee Saturday at 1:30 P.M. Night show begins at 8 p.m.
Ad. Don’t Miss “Listen to Leon,” A comedy in Three Acts presented by Senior Class Thornfield High School Friday, April 10, 1942. Cast: John Pierce, Geneva Wallace, Amy Delp, Olen Deckard, Russell Heriford, Bob Ball, Maxine Hobbs, Margie Griffith. Admission 10 and 25 cents.


From the Ozark County Times, 20 Jun 2008:
Ozark County Times
Oct. 20, 1909
At the last term of the Circuit Court, the Hammond Distilling Co. of Hammond, Mo., admitted the allegations as alleged in the petition by the Prosecuting Attorney and upon the recommendation of the grand jury, there were permitted to execute a bond in the sum of $1,000 to be forfeited upon the failure of the company to move all of the machinery and liquor out of the county by the first day of February. This will remove one of the great evils that was started in the west part of the county.
Sept. 2, 1910
Caney: Mr. Mat Cockrum is improving his place by erecting a handsome new building on the site of the old Thos. Cockrum residence. When the old building is torn away, it will remove one of the old landmarks, Uncle Tom having built it more than 37 years ago.
Mr. Gordon Hannaford and Miss Partha Amyx were married Sunday morning at the home of M. K. Amyx, father of the bride. Justice A. P. Morrison officiating.
Lilly: Mrs. Josie Markham of Kentucky came in on the hack Friday evening to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. N. J. Blacksher.
Sept. 16, 1910
Howard Ridge: Everett Pleasant, a member of the Lick Creek ball team was hurt several days ago in a game between the Lick Creek and the Theodosia teams. He was hit on the jaw with the ball and is suffering much with the injury.
Lilly: W. P. and Geo P. White purchased a molasses mill from R. C. Crawford and are making preparations to begin making molasses at an early date.
June 29, 1928
Two bandits about 9:30 o’clock last Friday morning entered the Bank of Rockbridge and after forcing the cashier, John P. Edwards, to hand them over $1200 made their escape on foot. . . Rex Byerley, 19-year-old orphan is now serving on a 10-year sentence in the state penitentiary for robbing the Rockbridge bank in May.
Aug. 30, 1929
Lutie School: The whooping cough is raging here, and some are absent on account of it. Our students are live wires and are doing their work splendidly.
Ad: 16 qt. aluminum dish pan 95 cents; 17 qt granite dish pan 65 cents; extra quality granite tea kettle sale price 98 cents; stew kettles, extra quality, 50 cents. Hobbs Bros. & Son, Longrun, Mo.
Oct. 18, 1929
Shiloh: The pie supper here Oct. 12 was well attended, and all reported a nice time. The program given was excellent. Miss Verna Friend won the cake; the jar of pickles was awarded Miss Cleo Austin and Eddie Friend, the soap to John Riggs. The proceeds amounted to $33.36 which will be used to buy school supplies.
Center Point: N. B. Owens and Lexa Jones have been helping Geo. A. Rose put in his electric lights.
April 30, 1942
The “Stitch and Chatter” Home Economics Club of Barren Fork met at the home of Mrs. Lee High on April 15. The day was spent in quilting and a discussion of a future 4-H Club in that community.
Miss Velma McGinnis of Locust became the bride of Roy Dunnegan of Nottinghill on Wednesday of last week. The ceremony was performed at Gainesville by the Rev. Howard Willhoit of Lutie.
Nov. 2, 1944
Word has been received here that Staff Sgt. Virgil H. Fry, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fry of Wasola, has been seriously wounded in action in Germany Oct. 7. Pvt. Fry was recently promoted to Staff Sergeant.


From the Ozark County Times, 27 Jun 2008:
Oct. 12, 1939
The Amyx Auto Co. now have some new 1940 Ford cars on display in their show room. They have several mechanical improvements as well as body styling. You should step in and see these new models.
Barren Creek Items: Sister Audie Ingram filled her regular appointment here last Saturday and Sunday. We are planning to start a revival here in the near future.
C. S. House, who has been in Dow City, Iowa, has returned and also his son Ray who has been away in he CCC camp in Oregon.
Miss Bessie Blackburn who is teaching at the Banner school was a visitor here Saturday night.
Oct. 19, 1939
Work on the new court house is now going on rapidly towards completion; the plastering is all done and the carpenters are putting in the wood trimmings and doors and painters are following up. We now believe it will be completed in time for the November term of circuit court.
Ad: Moving picture show equipment complete with sound and screen. Bargain. See or write H. G. Brown
West Plains Smith Chapel: On Sunday, Oct. 8, more than 150 people gathered at the home of Uncle Ed Brown to help him celebrate his 74th birthday. A bountiful dinner was served after which several gifts were presented to Uncle Ed.
Pontiac: M. C. Willbanks has bought a set of corn burrs and will soon be operating a mill at his home on Skyline Drive 1 2/4 miles east of here. Bert Coffey is now looking thru the view window of a V-8.
June 6, 1940
The Gainesville Boosters lost an awful 11 inning game 4 – 3 score to the Ava team last Sunday. From all appearance our boys were on a batting slump. Red Blackburn and Denny Bayless failing to strut their usual stride at the bat. According to Manager Granny McClendon, each team played to the satisfaction of the fans and many thrilling and heart breaking plays were made.
Mr. and Mrs. Mearle Luna, Mrs. U. B. Parker and Mrs. Gene Luna left Monday for Springfield where they will attend the State Teachers college during the summer.
June 20, 1940
The Gainesville ball team defeated the Ava bys by a score of 11 to 3 in their contest here Sunday. Our boys showed lots of pep and after the second inning, Ava failed to score. McGuire and Shanks did some good work on the mount and with the cooperation of the rest of the team, Ava was an easy victim for us.
The annual County Singing Convention was held here June 16, The crowd in attendance was estimated at more than 2,000 people. There were singers from all parts of the county and from adjoining counties…Loud speakers were installed so that the large crowd which overflowed the high school gymnasium might be able to enjoy the great song fest. At the noon hour all enjoyed a basket dinner with an hour of greeting old friends and kindred…The afternoon was given to another feast of songs adjourning about 4:30 singing “God be with you till we meet again.”
March 7, 1957
Ronnie Mahan and Eldon Williams will appear on KYTV Search for Talent program on Sunday, March 10, at 2:30 p.m. Joe Lynn Bushong, son of Mr. and Mrs. Doin Bushong, Gainesville, is stationed aboard the USS Holder DDE 819. As a member of the crew, he has visited such places as Brest, France, Pyrous, Greece, Naples, Italy.
Lilly Ridge: Mr. and Mrs. Joe Blacksher visited awhile at the Henry Huse home. Joe was anxious for them to have a piece of the fine fish he had caught.
We were glad to see Wanda Lea Blacksher on TV Wednesday evening.
Lone Ash: Alva McCullough was the lucky one. He entered a contest at the Super Market at Springfield and won first prize – an Admiral TV set.
Hammond: Mr. and Mrs. Russell Farmer were at Floyd Swearington’s Saturday night watching TV.
Ad: Used TV sets from $39.95 up. Gainesville Hardware & Furniture, Phone 79, Gainesville, MO.
Ocie: Truman Risley did good on the Search for Talent program last Sunday afternoon. Janice Taylor, Fern Upton and John L. Harlin are among those spending a between-semester vacation with their parents here. They will return to SMS in Springfield this weekend.
Isabella: Virginia Pettit was horse back riding Sunday, and the horse fell on her leg and broke it. She is in a hospital at Springfield.


From the Ozark County Times, 4 Jul 2008:
The Boomerang, Bakersfield
July 5, 1902
The “Glourious Fourth” has come and gone. Two thousand people thoroughly enjoyed themselves at Bakersfield, the day being an ideal one. . . The march was headed by C. A. Langston in an “Uncle Sam” suit and C. T. Brown with his tin horn. A number of hot air balloons were sent up during the afternoon, and these with a bluff at fighting made by two young men from Howell County, constituted the entire free entertainment. Six lemonade stands and four swings did a rushing business from early in the morning until late in the afternoon. The crowd was the largest ever seen here. . .
Ozark County News
June 18, 1903
The people of Howards Ridge enjoyed the day last Sunday in a picnic with dinner on the ground and preaching by Rev. A. L. Simmons who filled his regular appointment at that place. –––––
Bills are out for a big two-day picnic and fish fry to be held Friday and Saturday, July 3 and 4, on Lick Creek, 7 miles east of Gainesville on Dr. John F. Clayton’s farm. –––––
The Central Hotel has been sold. B. W. Hogard, the proprietor, sold the hotel to Thos. Witt. The deal was made last week, but the hotel will not change hands until July 15 when Mr. Witt will move in and take charge while Mr. Hoggard will devote his attention to handling stock. –––––
Do you know that Romance will celebrate the glorious Fourth again this year? . . . Romance always celebrates. More elaborate preparations are being made than ever before for a real good time, and we hear many persons express their intentions of going to Romance the 4th. –––––
Charley and C. B. Stevens of this place went to Springfield the first of the week after their new hacks for the stage line. –––––
Only a few more days until the first day of July. Then Gainesville will have a stage line between here and West Plains. The mail contract was let to E. K. Sanders of this place, who will conduct this end of the line, while the east end will be conducted by Charley Stevens who will move to West Plains for that purpose. Good new hacks have been bought for the purpose, and nothing will be left undone for the provisions of the needs of the public. Express and small freight shipments can be carried with some regularity, and passengers can go and come without loss of time.
Ozark County Times
June 13, 1940
Court House Turned Over to County. The total cost of the court house is $43,487 of this the PWA pays 45 percent, the county the balance.
March 7, 1957
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Wade and family entertained Sunday with a family dinner in honor of Jane and Larry Wade, children of the Wades, and Ronnie Goodwyn, son of Mr. and Mrs. O’Dean Goodwyn who are celebrating birthdays this month. . . The family joined Ronnie in his big wish to win one if not all of the games at the state tournament at Columbia this week. –––––
Ad: Ozark Theatre: Wednesday, March 13, Love Me Tender Elvis Presley, Richard Egan, Debra Paget. In CinemaScope –––––
Bakersfield: C. P. Carter has sold his trained saddle mare and has purchased an untrained horse and has begun training him. Cecil has trained and sold several horses the past few years. –––––
Caves? Yes we have two caves here. One is northwest of Bakersfield…One is called the Bear cave and the other the Wolf cave. In 1915, I went with about 50 young folks into the caves. I hadn’t heard much talk about them since, but I still know where they are. They are both large caves and run in several directions and have very large rooms. They also are dry caves.


From the Ozark County Times, 11 Jul 2008:
Ozark County News
May 28, 1896
Mr. H. A. Ebrite desires to call the attention of the public to the fact that he has just opened a barber shop at the Central Hotel, and asks a liberal share of the patronage of the public. Mr. Ebrite has had experience in tonsorial work, and is prepared to do all kinds of work in the art in the latest style.
Dec. 19, 1901
Phillip Decker, the well-known lumber dealer of near Rockbridge, was in the city today on business and gave us a call. -----------
William Mahan, of Rockbridge, was transacting business in the city today. Mr. Mahan is talking up arrangements to get mail connection between Rockbridge and Gainesville. If his proposition goes through, the old Caney Post office will be re-established on Pine Creek, near Judge Amyx’s. This mail route is needed, and we hope it will be granted. Gainesville would also be benefited by getting our daily mail direct from Bakersfield instead of West Plains as at present. Now it requires two days for a letter to go from Gainesville to Bakersfield and nearly a week for one to reach Rockbridge, yet both places are in the county and within 22 miles of Gainesville. Give us a mail service we can appreciate.
April 16, 1903
B. W. Hogard is circulating a petition to build a telephone line from this place to Theodosia. Those who subscribe to the enterprise will have the privilege of using the line to the value of every dollar they subscribe. If the line is built to Theodosia, it is the intention of the builders to extend the line to Oakland, Ark., and it is expected that Mr. Bronson, of Ozark, Christian County, will extend from that place to Theodosia. Even if we can get a line to Oakland, Gainesville will have open communication in North Arkansas and South Missouri and will be well connected with the outside world. -----------
Morris Wood, who has been employed by the Theodosia Milling Co., as engineer, for several months, came home the first of the week. The company has secured a new water wheel and water power will now be used to run the mill. -----------
Frank Walker, night clerk at the “Met” Hotel, spent a few days the latter part of last week at J. W. Pratt’s farm on lower Lick Creek, fishing and hunting.
Dec. 10, 1903
Gainesville Camp No. 5180 Modern Woodmen of America meets first and third Friday nights in each month. Alex. Crumley, V. C., John T. Luna, Clerk.
Ozark County Times
Nov. 2, 1939
Lilly Ridge: A shower and charivari was given at Albert Blacksher’s for Mr. and Mrs. Jarrett Hicks Tuesday night. -----------
A delightful birthday dinner was spread by the many friends and relatives of Sam Martin at his home in Oakland, Ark., also for his granddaughter, Mary Ruth McDonald. Many came from distant parts of North Arkansas and South Missouri to help celebrate his 71st birthday and his granddaughter’s 15th birthday. -----------
Notice: In order to comply with the new wage and hour law which took effect Oct. 24, 1939, we are forced to change the time of opening and closing the Bank of Gainesville. In the future the doors will open at 8 a.m. and close at noon and open at 1 pm. And close at 3:30 p.m. . . . It is not what we would like to do, but it is the law and we must comply. H. T. Harlin Cashier.
Nov. 30, 1939
Ad – Modern Beauty Shop: A special get acquainted offer until Dec. 10, 1939: A plain shampoo and wave 25 CENTS. An oil or Drene Shampoo and Wave 40 cents. ----------- Mrs. Dwight Lyle, an efficient operator, who has worked the past five years in the Blue Bonnet Beauty Shop in Springfield is now operating my shop. Flo Edmonds Prop.


From the Ozark County Times, 18 Jul 2008:
Ozark County News
Feb. 7, 1889
The expense of keeping up the public road is becoming considerable. It amounts this year to over $600.
May 16, 1889
Grabeel: Our aged friend and neighbor, Mr. William Newsom has passed beyond the toils of this world. He died May 11 leaving a wife and little daughter.
Feb. 13, 1890
The minstrel troup of this place will show at Dora Saturday night.
July 3, 1890
Clark Bros. circus exhibited here last Monday and was attended by a large crowd from all over the county.
Feb. 12, 1891
A number of gypsies have pitched their camp south of town. -----------
George MacDonald is standing high this week. It’s a boy, and George says it adds one more to the Republican party.
April 2, 1891
The Gainesville Blues and the Noble Reds played an interesting game of ball at Noble last Friday which resulted in a victory for the Blues. -----------
We are grieved to learn of the death of Mrs. A. C. Luna and Mrs. John Patrick both of whom died this week.
Aug. 6, 1903
The telephone line to Theodosia was completed and connections made Tuesday evening of last week, and the first message sent over the line was an order by Wood & Reed At Theodosia to the News office for some job printing. The next move now will be to put in a switch board at Gainesville. Then nearly every house in town will put in a phone.
Dec. 10, 1903
Died, at his home near Dugginsville last Thursday, Evening, Dec. 3, A. J. Coffey, after a brief illness from pneumonia. Deceased was a pioneer settler of the county and for many years, he lived on his farm six miles south of Gainesville…The remains were buried last Saturday evening at the family cemetery four miles south of Gainesville. The funeral services were conducted by the Masonic lodge of this place.
Dec. 24, 1903
Floyd Terry, living east of town captured a large gray eagle Sunday in a steel trap which he had set for a fox. The trap caught it by the middle toe of the left foot, therefore it was not maimed or disfigured. The big bird measures 6 ft 6 inches from tip to tip of its wings. John C. Harlin purchased it, and he expects to keep it in a cage until he can turn it over to a professional taxidermist when he will have it mounted. -----------
J. J. Collins has rented the residence south of the Wood & Reed store and is moving in this week. -----------
Uncle Bob Haskins of near Isabella was in the city yesterday, the guest of his nephew, Marion Haskins. -----------
Mrs. Ethel Stevens of West Plains came in Tuesday evening to spend the holidays with her parents, H. Walker of this place.
Jan. 21, 1904
Mr. Gaddy living on Lick Creek 8 miles southeast of town died at his home this morning. He had been ill some time but not considered dangerous until a few hours before his death. The 8 year old daughter of Mr. Gaddy died very suddenly last Sunday night after a few hours illness. -----------
Newt Martin, 12 miles west of town, entered normal school Monday. B. F. Breeding and Willie Witt living 8 miles west of town also entered the normal school Monday. -----------
Mrs. Gault, wife of Mark Gault, the well-known cattle dealer who lives on the Possum Walk, south of this place, died at the home late Monday evening after an illness of many weeks from stomach troubles.
Ozark County Times
Oct. 18, 1929
Sam Eads is running the Rockbridge mill during the absence of M. C. Bushong who is in a Springfield hospital recovering from an operation.
Dec. 27, 1929
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard F. Ebrite a fine boy. It arrived early Christmas morning. Mother and baby doing nice, also Leonard, but Grand Paps Bushong and Ebrite are requiring extraordinary and careful treatment. -----------
On last Thursday night, Dec. 19, the girls and boys basketball teams of Gainesville High played the Bakersfield teams. Both games were won by the GHS players. Those playing on the girls’ team for Gainesville were: Hill and Wood forwards, Lewis and Luna centers, Looney and Martin guards. The score was 22 to 7. Those on the boys team were Ford, Harlin, Hamilton, Grisham and Ford. The score being 24 to 9.


From the Ozark County Times, 25 Jul 2008:
Ozark County News
March 10, 1904
Haskins & Sanders are the proud owners of a brand new Oliver typewriter. -----------
M. D. Frazier of Lawndale was in town Tuesday with a load of potatoes which he sold to the Wood & Reed Mercantile Co. -----------
The Lick Creek telephone line is now complete as far down as J. W. Robbins’, 7 miles southeast of town. On the line, there are seven phones including the one at Wood & Reed’s farm. Those who have the phones in their house are satisfied now that they can’t get along without them. A move is now on foot to extend a line from Mammoth to Mountain Home.
April 28, 1904
E. K. Sanders is preparing to put in a new ferry boat on the Big North Fork just above the “Hodo” ferry. The boat will not be used for public purposes but simply to ferry the mail hack across when the river is too full to ford. Mr. Sanders only receives $2.10 a trip for his mail services and at this season of the year pays a dollar a trip for ferrage, hence the necessity of a private ferry. -----------
Charley Colvin and wife and Seth Conrad and wife all of Gainesville left here Sunday to visit relatives in Richland township, but found the streams of Pine Creek and Bryant so swollen from the rain of Saturday night that they could not cross. So they attended preaching at the Luna school house and returned home.
Ozark County Times
Nov. 9, 1939
The free educational picture show given at the school house, Tuesday night, was much enjoyed. Another show will be given next Tuesday night. -----------
The all day celebration at the Hodgson Spring was well attended. It was estimated that more than 200 people were present – relatives and friends from all over the county and many from adjoining counties. Mrs. George Hodgson, eldest of the Hodgson relatives present, suggested the old picnic ground in the upper mill bottom as the gathering place for the congregation to meet. The old familiar stomping ground brought back many pleasant but almost forgotten memories of gay crowds and goings on, of strands bedecked with the nation’s colors, of old glory floating in the breeze, of music and brass bands and plenty of old fashioned fireworks. The Needmore, Cedar Tree, Seed Tick, Odom and other singing classes were represented. Thirty three whose birthdays occurred in October were present to enjoy the singing . The youngest was Iodema King, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde King and great great grand daughter of Grandpa Hodgson. The Homecoming Day and celebration will be held at the Pat Martin spring the second Sunday in August next year. -----------
David Wallace dropped dead at his home near Hammond on Monday. Mr. Wallace, a widely known and respected citizen of Hammond, 72 years old, had been in declining health of late. He had been out about the premises of his home that morning when he began suffering a pain in his breast. He went to the house and asked his wife to fix him a dose of medicine which he had been taking. She prepared it and was handing it to him when he dropped over dead. . .. Mr. Wallace was a member of the Masonic Lodge at Lutie. Burial will be at Thornfield. Burial arrangements are in charge of the Southern Missouri Burial Association. Mr. Wallace is survived by his wife, eight sons, two daughters, two brothers, two sisters and many other relatives.
Nov. 16, 1939
Ad for sale at the David Wallace home – by Mrs. D. O. Wallace. Selling 1 horse, 5 cows, pair of fox hounds, Chevrolet roadster 1932 model, blacksmith tools, horse buggy, double barrel shot gun mowing machine turning plow, cook stove beds, springs dresser, 300 acres of land. J. C. Harlin Auctioneer and A. L. Wallace clerk
Dr. A. J. Crumbaugh, Federal Veterinarian, will be in Ozark County testing cattle for Bang’s disease Nov. 20—26 according to information received by county agent J. J. Cowan. Anyone wishing to have their cattle tested write or call the County Agent’s office In Gainesville.







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